Prince William’s watershed speech shows Duke of Cambridge ‘trusts Kate implicitly’

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PRINCE WILLIAM’s difficult speech on slavery was a “joint act” with Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, according to a royal commentator. The Duke of Cambridge condemned slavery as an “abhorrent” act that “should have never happened” during a watershed speech delivered at King’s House in Jamaica, one of the stops included in the royals’ tour in the Caribbean.

 

 

While Prince William was the one delivering this address, royal author Robert Jobson believes it may have been the result of a “joint act” with Kate.The author of the upcoming biography William at 40 told OK! magazine: “I could see the speech was a joint act with his wife standing by him as support.”I’m sure he’d have bounced ideas off her.”They know each other so well and I think he trusts Catherine implicitly.”

 

 
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Prince William and Kate visited Belize, Jamaica and The Bahamas during an eight-day tour in March.Their first joint tour abroad in two years was marred by missteps as well as protests, calls for slavery reparations and hints the nations may one day sever their remaining ties with the Crown.Tackling the issue of slavery, the Duke expressed his “profound sorrow” while his wife Kate looked on.

 

 

He started by saying he “strongly agreed” with his father Prince Charles, who in November said the slave trade is Britain’s dark stain”.The Prince of Wales was in Barbados at the time to watch the country breaking away from the British monarchy and becoming a republic.Prince William went on saying: “Slavery was abhorrent. And it should never have happened.

 

 

“While the pain runs deep, Jamaica continues to forge its future with determination, courage and fortitude.”The strength and shared sense of purpose of the Jamaican people, represented in your flag and motto, celebrate an invincible spirit.”

 

 
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The Duke of Cambridge did not apologise for Britain’s role in the slave trade or its colonial past, as demanded by some activists.Earlier that day in Jamaica, Prince William and Kate were also put on notice by the country’s Prime Minister, Andrew Holness, who hinted at a possible future as a republic saying his nation is “moving on”.

 

 

As his views on the speech delivered in Jamaica by William prove, Mr Jobson believes the Duke and Duchess work as a team – not just when it comes to their duties but also to bring up their family.He said: “It’s so important that William and Catherine are a team.”She’s benefited from not coming from a broken home.”He had the issues of dramatic divorce. It all played out in a very public light and it’s the last thing he’d want for his children.

 

 

“It’s very much part of his determination that he has a strong marriage and a strong family.”But Catherine and William were friends before they were lovers and enjoyed a long courtship before marriage.”Because of this they really complement each other.”We always see them laughing and making sure the other is relaxed in public.”

 

 
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Kate and William met in 2001, when they both started a four-year BA course at St Andrews University.After striking a friendship, they started a romantic relationship in 2003.

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